Jeremiah 25-26

Review: “You have not listened” seems to be a recurring theme (25:3-8)…..Because of this devastation and desolation are the inevitable result (25:9-11)…..The 70 years of exile in Babylon (25:12) puts a limit on the judgement and exile due to Judah’s inattention…..The wine cup (25:15-29) symbolizes a lack of control, an inability to stand, which leads to a fall by the sword…..YHWH is more upset with the shepherds (25:30-38) than the sheep for the crisis…..Because of Jeremiah’s prediction, he’s put on trial (26:1-12)…..It is the religious leaders (26:8-9) most threatened by Jeremiah’s words during the reign of Jehoiakim…..He enjoys the support of the royalty and common people generally (26:10-16)…..An account is given (26:18-24) of two contemporary prophets to Jeremiah, Micah and Uriah, to compare his fate to Judah’s.

Commentary: One of Judah’s main transgressions, though not mentioned in the text, was their inability to keep the Sabbath (cp. Lev. 26:33-35, 2 Chr. 36:21)…..It’s interesting that Daniel, captive in Babylon, was well aware of Jeremiah’s “writings” (Dan. 9:2) as if he picked them up at a corner scroll store…..There were three deportations – in 604 , 597, and 586 BC…..Captive Judah was released from Babylon by the decree of Cyrus (Ezra 1:1-3)…..The predicted 70 years exile appears to be a round number – not exact…..Typically wine in the OT is a symbol of joy and gladness, not in this case, owning to the dual nature of this beverage…..God holds leaders more accountable than the public at large (Luke 12:41-48)…..The scope of Jeremiah’s prophecy isn’t simply limited to Nebuchadnezzar’s invasion, it leaps to all of us (25:29) with seemingly no escape (Joel 1:15, Rev. 19:17-19, cp. Isa. 2:10-22)…..The deal with the prophets Micah and Uriah…..Uriah attempted to run from the Babylonians and was killed for his flight…..Micah accepted Babylonian captivity, along with Jeremiah, and stayed alive…..For Jeremiah, it turned out that he had less to fear from Babylonians than from the officials of the Temple.

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